Round Lake Environmental Tour Held Sept 24th

Tim Pasternak from the Round Lake Management Commission
Tim Pasternak from the Round Lake Management Commission
The predicted rain held off until early afternoon which gave those who attended the Round Lake Environmental Lecture and Tour a chance to learn more about our great asset, Round Lake.

Tim Pasternak along with other members of the Round Lake Management Commission and several local residents met with Leonard Dane and Melissa McGuire from the Lake County Health Department on September 24, 2011 to listen to an on-site environmental lecture and tour of Round Lake. Several types of “weeds” were given to Leonard who identified them and talked about what is required to control them.

Melissa McGuire from the Lake County Health Department
Melissa McGuire from the Lake County Health Department
He mentioned treating the lake, especially the boating areas, with a chemical called 24D which is harmless to fish and humans. This would need to be done early in the season when the water is cooler and growth had just begun. The biggest culprit in Round Lake is Eurasian Watermilfoil which is a submerged aquatic plant that can quickly form thick mats in shallow areas of lakes and rivers. These “mats” can interfere with swimming and entangle propellers, which hinders boating, fishing, and waterfowl hunting. It will also displace native aquatic plants, impacting fish and wildlife.

Also attending the event were several young girls from Girl Scout Troop 40905 from Round Lake Beach along with their Troop leaders.

Round Lake Beach Girl Scout Troop 40905 attended the environmental lecture
Round Lake Beach Girl Scout Troop 40905 attended the environmental lecture

Leonard Dane, Water Quality Specialist II, discussed the various types of aquatic organisms growing in the lake, how they may have gotten there, and what can be done to control them.
Leonard Dane describes a device they use for determining a lot about the lake's water quality
Leonard Dane describes a device they use for determining a lot about the lake's water quality

He also took the group on a shoreline tour, pointing out various efforts that have been made by waterfront homeowners to prevent shoreline erosion.
Waterfront erosion control using stones
Waterfront erosion control using stones


Waterfront erosion control using old telephone poles
Waterfront erosion control using old telephone poles


Shoreline erosion control using steel and formed concrete. Do NOT use crushed concrete!
Shoreline erosion control using steel and formed concrete. Do NOT use crushed concrete!


Undisturbed shoreline shows trees eventually ending up in the water
Undisturbed shoreline shows trees eventually ending up in the water

Questions were answered along the way and there were demonstrations showing how they determine water depth, the amount of light getting below the surface, and how samples of the water at the bottom are obtained. The environmental tour lasted just over two hours and those who attended left with a much better knowledge of Round Lake.

There was quite a bit of wind which was picked up in the audio but you will still get a good idea of what the tour consisted of. If you would like to volunteer and join the Round Lake Management Commission team, please contact Tim at 847-644-3976

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