Ballot questions that Lake County voters will face

Ballot questions that Lake County voters will face

Nineteen referendums will appear on Lake County ballots this fall, asking voters about school construction projects, water system improvements and many other issues.

Most are for specific school districts or municipalities, so no voters will see all 19 questions. Many will see two or more.

Here’s a look at some of the issues that readers of this page will see on their ballot:

Round Lake Heights
Voters will be asked to approve a $2.7 million loan to build an independent water and sewer system. The village now buys water from neighboring Round Lake Beach. If approved, the owner of a $200,000 house would pay about $388 more in property taxes to the village the first year.

Gavin District 37
Ingleside-based Gavin Elementary District 37 officials want to borrow $6 million to fund roof repairs, security improvements and other projects at Gavin Central and Gavin South. The district’s property tax rate is set to drop after a loan is paid off this year.

If approved, owners of a house valued at $200,000 would pay about $30 less in property taxes to the district the first year. If voters reject the plan, the tax decrease will be about $186 the first year.

Voters rejected a similar request earlier this year.

Round Lake Fire Protection District
Residents in the Greater Round Lake Fire Protection District will be asked to approve a $4.5 million loan to fund renovations at the three fire stations, and equipment and vehicle purchases.

Officials want to improve the living spaces for firefighters, and replace an ambulance and a fire engine that dates to the 1990s.

If approved, the owner of a house valued at $200,000 would pay about $30 more in property taxes to the district the first year.

Townships
Voters in unincorporated areas of Avon, Fremont and Shields townships will decide if the townships should approve garbage collection contracts.

Advisory questions
Lake County voters will be asked if the General Assembly should amend the Illinois Constitution to ban a statewide property tax increase.

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